Ulyana Sergeenko and the Russian heritage

Ulyana Sergeenko is a Russian fashion designer.

Being passionate about fashion, she started collecting vintage clothes and accessories from a very young age. She loved hunting for the new rarities therefore she frequently visited markets or vintage boutiques as well as major auctions to find them. After becoming a client of luxury brands Valentino, Givenchy, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel and Dior she was noted for her refined and sophisticated style.

At first, Ulyana collaborated with various designers for the creation of pieces for their collections, but since she did not receive any credit for her work she afterwards decided to launch her own fashion label. Miss Sergeenko brand was launched in Moscow in April 2011 with the Fall Winter 2011/2012 collection. After the first two collections were shown, the brand received lots of media attention alongside with many requests from all over the world.

Nowadays the Russian company produces ready-to-wear women clothes, bags, fine jewellery and headpieces. Besides the retail stock, there is an atelier where clients can order made-to-measure versions of the runway items. The style of Sergeenko’s couture collections is a blend of military, literary and fairytale influences.

One of the key principles of Ulyana’s work is meticulous attention to details and high quality.

Everything is produced in Moscow under the strict control of the designer herself. All fabrics and trimmings are bought in France, Italy or Japan and some garments have vintage details that have been specifically picked at antique markets.

Craftsmanship and technical knowledge have defined her work from the beginning, indeed the stylist collaborates with numerous highly skilled ateliers from Russia.

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With her, every season is a new story about her native country.
To give an example, her Spring 2016 couture collection “marries two eras: the 1980s, just before the fall of Communism, and the turn of the 20th century, just before the Russian revolution” as reported on Vogue Runway.
The show was a success – as the majority of her works are – furthermore becoming an occasion to confirm her good taste in fashion and exclusive elegance.

Hussein Chalayan and the concept of the veil

Hussein Chalayan is a British/Turkish Cypriot fashion designer, globally known for being an innovator. The huge success he has nowadays mainly comes from the meaningful concepts laying behind his collections and his ability to create products that are unique in the market.

Born in Nicosia in 1970, he soon moves to London and takes the British citizenship. After studying at Warwickshire School of Arts, he manages to enter the prestigious Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (also graduating there).

He immediately gets noticed for his creativity and starts being rewarded with many prizes. His main inspirations are contemporary society and the two different cultures in the middle of whom he grew up. However architecture, philosophy and technology are other important stimulus.

The designer’s career is also characterized by numerous collaborations and partnerships with brands such as Yoox, Swarowsky, Puma but also celebrities like singer Lady Gaga and avant-garde artist Bjork.

Today, I want to present here one of his shows – influenced by the Turkish Cypriot heritage – which is Spring Summer 1998.
The collection is intended as a statement on the oppression of Muslim women and displays models wearing chadors of varying lengths – from fully clothed to totally nude.

On 21st April 1998, the New York Times states: “Few designers can move an audience to tears — they might bring people to their feet or bore them to distraction — but clothes are rarely so poignant that they elicit crying. Hussein Chalayan proved he possessed such power with his spring 1998 collection in England last season, a provocative exploration of Islamic women’s place in society using the chador as the fulcrum.”

To the many critics he received he replied: “It wasn’t really supposed to be offensive. It was supposed to illustrate a particular kind of position. This was about the cultural loss of self.